Album reviews: Anton

ChainDLK
Grade: 5/5

Daniel & Mikael Tjernberg are the brothers behind the band called Lost Kingdom and they also compose music and perform music in other settings in different genres. The brothers have only breifly before ventured into the world of film scores but for all of us who listened to the brothers before this was the obvious step. The same goes for several other Waerloga Records artists such as Simon Kölle (www.simonkolle.com) in Za Frumi who happened to master this album brilliantly.

Daniel & Mikael have outdone themselves really with this soundtrack. The name of the film is Anton and the film is in the sci-fi genre. Here you can find a teaser from the movie http://vimeo.com/visualcooks/antonteaser and here you can find an awesome promo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lRUK0jfWLGA

As far as my opinion on the music goes I have to say I am very happy that Daniel & Mikael for real evolved their sound in this way. The Chronicle of the Black Monks, which were the brothers soundtrack debut, was also good and more in the vein we come to know Lost Kingdom. With Anton the brothers have become way whole so to speak.

Daniel & Mikael turns up the power for the release of Anton. Stoked by a vast combination of percussion, horns and really strange and cool fusion jazz elements. It does not end there as the brothers freely and with great result also experiment in genres such as classical and ambient (of course Dark Ambient).

For all you that like Post Apocalyptic soundscapes you should check this out as it! Orchestral mastery interwoven with strange and sometimes surrealistic outbursts of jazz! While achieving malevolent drama with the cue Hunt the track that I love the most is Out of Hand as it is so strange and yet thrilling. The cue Anton I really enjoy as it also is way out there with the Fusion and strange elements of musical geniality. The cue Heartbeat is beautiful and dark but it’s the track Atmospheric Toxicity (and it’s reprise) that really give me chills and make me think of spy thrillers. The emotion truly comes when we reach the climactic cues, the sweeping strings tugging at the listener’s heart in the way only great composers can achieve.

This strange album is the best so far from the duo!

/Ivan Racheck
Original source: www.chaindlk.com

 
 

Facing North

Daniel and Mikael Tjernberg are brothers who create incredible neo-classical/jazz fusion/ambient music on the Swedish label Waerloga Records. Waerloga specializes in cinematic, science fiction, and dark fantasy music. The music of “Anton” is inspired by Cook’s science-fiction thriller “Anton” The Tjernberg brothers experiment with orchestral styles that are deeply moving, dark, and quite unique.

The album opens with “The Hunt”, a 7:10 minute overture-like piece that begins with kettle drums and a cello-bass string group. It evolves into a tango-like rhythm with a spooky, suspenseful mood. Track 2 “Atmospheric Toxicity” is spare and shadowy, with occasional statements by pizzicato strings and a clavichord. Track 3 “Postapocalyptic Landscape” begins in the ambient idiom and transitions into jazz fusion. The heavy bass lines hold down the bottom as strings gradually expound melodic material. Track 4 “Heartbeat” veers into the neo-classical idiom with a vocal chorale reminiscent of Gregorian chant. This brief piece is followed by Track 5 “Out of Hand”; It returns to the suspenseful, spare musical effects of the first two pieces, with occasional lapses into silence. Material is introduced by a piano and electric piano.

Track 6 “Hero” begins with an elegiac string melody that leads into a fuller orchestral section. The piece builds through textured layers of instrumental sound. Track 7 “Anton” is a lighter jazz-fusion song. The melodies are more playful and exploratory. Hesitant moments give the sense that Anton doesn’t quite know what he’s doing or is making it up as he goes along. The song builds momentum and becomes more coherent and driven by the percussion. Track 8 “Summoning” is like demented church music. A high flute-like instrument plays a wistful melody as bassoons and bass instruments honk here and there. Midway through the track a male vocal group begins a march-like chant which gives way to a meandering piano melody. The final Track 9 is “Atmospheric Toxicity reprise”, a re-developed version of the second track.

Since it was inspired by a film, it isn’t surprising that the music sounds like film-score music. With its dark orchestral colors, this album isn’t light or cheerful. However, it certainly would be useful for darker or intense rituals, spell-casting, or as background music for guided meditations that lead participants through difficult issues. This music has a strong effect. It isn’t for the airy-fairy crowd. A previous album by the Tjernberg brothers is titled “The Chronicle of the Black Monks”. Sounds very intriguing to me!

This is fantastically creative musical composition with a powerful gut impact. Highly recommended for those on grey or darker paths, or for people who prefer intellectually complex music to power their rituals. Bravo!

/Elizabeth Hazel
Original source: www.facingnorth.com

 
 

Heathen Harvest
Grade: 4/5

Anton is a brand new original soundtrack that has been set to a post-apocalyptic, Sci-fi short-film which was produced by Visual Cooks and released on the legendary Swedish label Waerloga. Behind this rather odd addition are the brothers Daniel and Mikael Tjernberg, known otherwise for their symphonic project Lost Kingdom, which unsurprisingly also resides on the same label. This is not the first time the brothers have joined forces to create a soundtrack, though since I’ve yet to hear the complete music from The Chronicle of the Black Monks, my other encounter with the Tjernbergs is through the tales told by Lost Kingdom.

Anton is truly a wild soundtrack that takes inspiration and influence from an assortment of different styles and arrangements that have mutated together to create an album that is both haunting and solemn. It gently evokes feelings of death and desolation and the compositions are quite suiting for an album that has the mission to portray a post-apocalyptic world. The music is well-performed and showcases a talent for thinking outside the box that is both refreshing and quite strange at times, especially considering the use of both classical and more modern styles that somehow blend perfectly together to create a continuous saga. Where one ends, another takes up its message and carries it forth. However, since the Anton OST is quite a weird collection of different styles and sounds, it’s exceptionally hard to judge it as a complete entity. While I love the ominous and moody “Atmospheric Toxicity”, whose deep strings and breathtaking atmosphere really paint up an almost McCarthy-esque bleak landscape that has been torn by war, I just can’t picture the things meant to be portrayed by the part-beating-part funky title track, “Anton”. This is probably due to a lack of context, for even if I personally never have imagined post-apocalyptic landscapes and a weird electronic jazz fusion together, these two lunatics obviously have, and it truly is an intriguing composition in itself.

The album continues its wandering between genres and forms, and really feels like a journey through invisible landscapes. From the hectic “The Hunt” to the slow and serene “Hero”, the music weaves a strong story that etches onto you, and if nothing else, listening to the Anton OST gives me a strong urge to see the movie and knit context to some of the stranger songs such as the aforementioned title track. The strongest parts, in my opinion, are the more classically composed narratives such as “Atmospheric Toxicity” and “Heartbeat”, but overall, the album is bristling with potential. The production is great and almost feels too pure to be wearing titles such as “Postapocalyptic Landscape”. The soundtrack is equal parts ambience, experimental jazz, and modern classical, all melded together into something both brilliant and frightening at the same time. In the end, I give Anton my recommendation for its unique and refreshing take on a post-apocalyptic soundtrack.

/Skarsnik
Original source: www.heathenharvest.org

 
 

Lux Atenea Webzine

Con un impactante diseño de estética apocalíptica donde lo industrial y lo tenebroso se entremezcla con lo visualmente orgánico y herrumbroso, se presentó el pasado mes de noviembre esta impresionante banda sonora del thriller de ciencia-ficción “Anton” de temática post-apocalíptica (realizado por Visual Cooks, teaser). Nueve espectaculares temas compuestos por los hermanos Daniel y Mikael Tjernberg a través de una talentosa y genial definición musical de ecléctica inspiración donde los melómanos lectores de Lux Atenea Webzine podrán disfrutar de estas sublimes esencias sonoras propias del jazz fusión, de la música clásica contemporánea, del ambient y del neoclasicismo. Editado a través del sello discográfico sueco Waerloga Records, este siniestro digipak me impresionó visualmente nada más recibirlo hace muy pocos días, aumentando aún más mi valoración artística en cuanto empecé a escuchar estas potentes y obscuras composiciones de hipnótico influjo. Un lúgubre magnetismo sonoro que atrae a nuestra mente por la maestría musical con la que los hermanos Daniel y Mikael Tjernberg han engrandecido y perfilado cada uno de estos temas hasta pulirlos con detalles sonoros como solamente los genios con un don artístico especial son capaces de reflejar en sus composiciones. Con la contundencia sonora de los instrumentos de percusión dará comienzo la inmersión en esta terrorífica jungla donde el tema “The Hunt” se convierte en la llamada del depredador, en su adrenalínico sudor en busca de su presa mientras esta permanece oculta a su mirada. Cuando los pasajes melódicos aparezcan, serán los anunciadores del comienzo del siguiente tema, “Atmospheric Toxicity”, donde el vigor musical neoclásico verá mermado su épico impulso pero sin perder en ningún momento su dramatismo sonoro o su trágica esencia de desesperación a través de este sublime plano instrumental protagonizado por el violonchelo. A continuación, todo se iluminará a nuestro alrededor en “Postapocalyptic Landscape” con esa extraña luz que queda en el ambiente después de una terrible tormenta, dando el tema “Heartbeat” un giro sonoro radical en el entorno con esta impresionante dimensión sonora de corte sacro que les dejará profundamente impresionados. ¡¡¡“Heartbeat”, talento y sabiduría musical!!! En “Out Of Hand”, de nuevo serán los vientos sonoros ambient en una estructura claramente experimental los que impulsen su cromatismo instrumental hacia recreaciones musicales mucho más siniestras, elevando su fuerza neoclásica hasta renacer de sus cenizas épicas para luego alzarse con una vitalidad melódica colosal en el tema “Hero”, otra de las joyas musicales de este álbum. Dando continuidad a este estado de sorpresa permanente en relación a las diferentes secuencias sonoras que dan vida a esta brillante amalgama melódica, el jazz fusión que marca el tema “Anton” nos llevará directos a otra de las joyas musicales de este álbum: “Summoning”. Una recreación sonora mucho más inquietante y fantasmagórica que derivará hacia terrenos propios de la música clásica contemporánea para luego cerrar esta admirable banda sonora con el tema “Atmospheric Toxicity (reprise)”. “Anton – OST”, virtuosa comunión musical para esta prodigiosa banda sonora. ¡¡¡Disfrútenlo!!!

With a striking design of apocalyptic aesthetic where the industrial and dark mixes with organic and rusty visually presented last November, this awesome soundtrack thriller sci-fi “Anton” post- apocalyptic theme (performed by Visual Cooks). Nine Great compounds by brothers Daniel and Mikael Tjernberg through a talented and brilliant definition of eclectic musical inspiration where music lovers Lux Atenea Webzine readers will enjoy these sublime essences own sound fusion jazz, contemporary classical music, themes ambient and neoclassicism. Produced through the Swedish Waerloga Records label, this incident digipak impressed me visually just receive it a few days ago, further increasing my artistic discretion regarding started listening to these powerful and dark compositions of hypnotic influence. A mournful sound magnetism that attracts our mind musicianship with which the brothers Daniel and Mikael Tjernberg have enlarged and shaped each of these topics to polishing with sonic detail as only genius with a special artistic talent are able to reflect on his compositions. With the sound strength of the percussion instruments will begin immersion in this terrifying jungle where’s “The Hunt” becomes the call of the predator, where adrenaline sweat in search of prey while it remains hidden to your look. When melodic passages appear, will be the announcers start the next topic, “Atmospheric Toxicity”, where the neoclassical musical force be diminished his epic drive but without ever losing its sound dramatic or tragic essence of despair through this sublime up starring instrumental cello. Then all lights around us in “Postapocalyptic Landscape” with that strange light that remains in the atmosphere after a terrible storm, giving the song “Heartbeat” a radical shift in the sound environment with this awesome sound dimension of religious court that will leave them deeply impressed. “Heartbeat”, musical talent and wisdom ! In “Out Of Hand” again will the winds ambient sound in a distinctly experimental structure which chromaticism to boost their instrumental music much more sinister recreations, raising its neoclassical force to rise from the ashes epic then claim a huge melodic vitality on “Hero”, another musical gems of this album. Continuing this permanent state of surprise in relation to the different sound sequences that give life to this brilliant melodic amalgam , jazz fusion brand’s ” Anton” lead us directly to another of the musical gems of this album: “Summoning”. A much more disturbing and spooky sound recreation to derive own grounds of contemporary classical music and then close this wonderful soundtrack with the song “Atmospheric Toxicity (reprise)”. “Anton – OST” virtuous communion for this prodigious musical soundtrack. Enjoy it!

Original source: luxatenealibros.blogspot.com

 
 

Darkroom-Magazine
Rating : 7.5

Tornano a farsi sentire i fratelli Tjernberg, che ricordiamo sia per i due notevoli album prodotti sotto il monicker Lost Kingdom fra il 2008 e il 2010, sia per “The Chronicle Of The Black Monks”, primo opus firmato dai due svedesi coi propri nomi e (comune) cognome, rilasciato dall’ottima Waerloga a fine 2011. È sempre la label svedese, che già si occupò di ambedue i lavori dei Lost Kingdom, a pubblicare “Anton”, che al pari del suo predecessore è in buona sostanza la colonna sonora di una pellicola: nella fattispecie, trattasi di un thriller sci-fi prodotto dalla Visual Cooks, con musica sia tratta dal film che ispirata ad essa. Da sempre devoti alle sonorità neoclassiche, i fratelli Tjernberg non vengono meno a tale prerogativa in questa nuova fatica, che si apre col severo sfondo percussivo di “The Hunt”, minacciosa opener dove emergono presto gli spunti sinfonici. Il mood generale è cupo e carico di mistero, come ben dimostra “Atmospheric Toxicity” (ripresa con maggiore enfasi drammatica anche nel finale), ma le abilità dei due scandinavi permettono di andare oltre il neoclassico: momenti di grande estro sperimentale e avanguardistico quali la notturna “Postapocalyptic Landscape” ed “Out Of Hand” stanno lì a dimostrarlo, e a ribadire con forza il concetto intervengono sia la title-track, ricca di spunti funky e prog rielaborati in una chiave assolutamente oscura, che una “Summoning” capace di passare da un incipit squisitamente vintage ad una coralità davvero sontuosa. Bene anche i frangenti più brevi, come il bel momento di musica sacra “Heartbeat” e le dolenti movenze sinfoniche di “Hero”. Come sempre in questi casi, disporre anche delle immagini del film completerebbe degnamente l’esperienza, ma le qualità strumentali dei due ed il pathos cinematico sprigionato dal loro notevole songwriting sanno comunque produrre il giusto effetto, facendo di “Anton” un lavoro con tutte le carte in regola per ingolosire i palati più fini, specie fra gli appassionati delle sonorità più sinfoniche e cinematiche.

They come back to bite the brothers Tjernberg, remember that both the two remarkable albums produced under the moniker Lost Kingdom between 2008 and 2010 , both for “The Chronicle Of The Black Monks”, the first opus signed by two Swedes with their own names and (common) name, released by the excellent Waerloga at the end of 2011. always the Swedish label, which already took care of both the work of the Lost Kingdom, to publish “Anton”, which like its predecessor is in essence the column sound of a film : in this case, it is a sci-fi thriller produced by Visual Cooks, both with music from the film that inspired it. Always devoted to the sounds neoclassical, the brothers are not Tjernberg not at that prerogative in this new work, which opens with severe percussive background of “The Hunt”, where menacing opener emerge early symphonic cues. The general mood is dark and full of mystery , as demonstrated by “Atmospheric Toxicity” (with an emphasis on dramatic upturn in the finale), but the ability of the two Scandinavian allow you to go beyond the neoclassical moments of great inspiration experimental and avant-garde such as night “Postapocalyptic Landscape” and “Out Of Hand” are there to prove it , and strongly emphasize the concept includes both the title track, full of ideas and funky prog reworked in an absolutely dark , that a ” Summoning” capable of passing from a starting exquisitely vintage chorus to a truly sumptuous. Well even the breakers shorter, like the beautiful moment of sacred music “Heartbeat” and the mournful symphonic movements of “Hero”. As always in these cases, also have the images of the film worthy complement the experience, but the quality of the two instrumental and the pathos kinematic released from their considerable songwriting know nevertheless produce the right effect, making “Anton” a job with all the papers in order to tempt the most discerning palates, especially among fans of the sound more symphonic and cinematic.

Roberto Alessandro Filippozzi
Original source: www.darkroom-magazine.it

 
 

Hypnagogue

Inspired by the script for an indie science fiction film, Anton by brothers Daniel and Mikael Tjernberg is not the sort of release I’d normally sit down and listen to. This is not to say it isn’t good. The problem is that too often I feel like I need to have the visuals that go along with it to really get it. The brothers hit their thematic landmarks without question. The opener, “The Hunt” is drum-driven and proceeds at a galloping pace, chased along on dramatic strings. Maybe, without the accompanying visual context, too dramatic for a casual listen. “Postapocalyptic Landscape” strolls along on a slightly jerky jazz feel and you can see the accompanying tracking shot from some character’s perspective. (You know, the kind that then switches to a face-on shot of the character walking, and then back). “Hero” builds on swelling, bold strings ready to blow the wind through anyone’s hair. Anton is a little too bombastic for me, and the mix of styles, while probably nicely tied into the feel of the film, wanders a bit much. Still, it’s worth a listen. The Tjernbergs are excellent composers and musicians. This is a case of something just not being my style.

Original source: www.hypnagogue.net

 
 

Blackaudio
Rating: 7.5/10

There are literally tons of underground short films out there and obviously, an underground soundtrack accompanies most of them. “Anton” is a Science Fiction thriller released by Visual Cooks and the brothers Tjernberg, who have done a number of soundtracks over the years, have produced a classically bombastic, accompanying CD.

Pounding tympani sections open up the proceedings with “The Hunt”; setting the pace before the obscure ambience of “Atmospheric Toxicity” and Jazz laden “Postapocalyptic Landscape” remind you that this is actually a soundtrack, with their complete lack of cohesion played back to back.

OST’s are by their nature, usually hard to swallow as a whole. Remembering that the songs you are listening to were penned to slot into a movie, assists in digesting the majority of releases out there created for this purpose. “Anton (ost)” though, does manage to hold weight by making sure each track is a song in its own right; and whist nothing truly works side by side in one sitting, there is the added benefit that Daniel and Mikael know how to create actual music, where the individual tracks by themselves are quite strong.

Original source: www.blackaudio.wordpress.com